Mark’s Chuch

© Copyright 2007 - 2021 / Anders Clausson

St. Mark’s Church - Björkhagen - Stockholm
In 1955, the Enskede church council decided to announce an architectural competition for the new church. Five architects were invited: Georg Varhelyi, Peter Celsing, Hans Asplund, Ture Ryberg and Sigurd Lewerentz. Sigurd Lewerentz was eventually commissioned to design the church. On March 29, 1958, the construction of St. Mark’s Church began, and it became an unusual project for its time. From a building lodge, the architect daily led the work. Lewerentz’s attention was especially focused on the tasks of the masons, who respected his creativity and knowledge. The church was inaugurated on May 8, 1960. Many anecdotes came from this building lodge, several of which illustrated that Lewerentz could be a very firm master. One tiler thought that if he did what Lewerentz wanted, he “wouldn’t get it straight,” to which Lewerentz replied: “Straight and straight, why should everything be straight? It will be beautiful even if it’s crooked.” And with a tin-smith Lewerentz had the following exchange of words: The tin-smith: “Why can’t I do what I usually do?” Lewerentz: “No, that is the only thing I know you should not do!” The church attracted considerable attention already during the construction period, both in Sweden and abroad, and in 1962, Sigurd Lewerentz received the first ever Kasper Salin Prize for the St. Mark’s church. In the church, Lewerentz used frameless windows for the first time. The insulating glass panes were set directly in the wall openings using elastic sealant. There are no door liners, skirtings or moldings and the electrical wiring is visible on the masonry and forms its own architectural expression. The painting is extremely sparse, the surface layers are dominated by natural materials, bricks from Helsingborg's Steam Tile Mill, floor tiles from Höganäs, glulam beams and plywood boards. Most of the lighting fixtures and benches are designed by Lewerentz himself. The church organ is also designed by Lewerentz, with side pieces of plywood. The decoration of the Markus church was created by the artist couple Barbro and Robert Nilsson. They designed, among other things, the two tapestries behind the altar and the crucifix in between. Robert Nilsson also created the church silver, the bronze plate in the wooden gate, and the clinker relief in the façade above the gate. Within the property there are also meeting rooms and a pastor's office around a courtyard with a mirror pond with a bronze fountain, the Lotus Flower by Robert Nilsson. In a side building next to the parish expedition there is a bell tower with four bells. Since the church was inaugurated in 1960, manual bell ringing has been used. The Mark’s Bell-Ringers, a non-profit organization, are responsible for the weekend bell ringings. A fifth bell is placed outside the church gate. It is used especially at the ringing in of the Sabbath, every Saturday evening at 6 PM.
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MARKS CHURCH - Enskede In 1955, the Enskede church council decided to announce an architectural competition for the new church. Five architects were invited: Georg Varhelyi, Peter Celsing, Hans Asplund, Ture Ryberg and Sigurd Lewerentz. Sigurd Lewerentz was eventually commissioned to design the church. On March 29, 1958, the construction of St. Mark’s Church began, and it became an unusual project for its time. From a building lodge, the architect daily led the work. Lewerentz’s attention was especially focused on the tasks of the masons, who respected his creativity and knowledge. The church was inaugurated on May 8, 1960. Many anecdotes came from this building lodge, several of which illustrated that Lewerentz could be a very firm master. One tiler thought that if he did what Lewerentz wanted, he “wouldn’t get it straight,” to which Lewerentz replied: “Straight and straight, why should everything be straight? It will be beautiful even if it’s crooked.” And with a tin- smith Lewerentz had the following exchange of words: The tin-smith: “Why can’t I do what I usually do?” Lewerentz: “No, that is the only thing I know you should not do!” The church attracted considerable attention already during the construction period, both in Sweden and abroad, and in 1962, Sigurd Lewerentz received the first ever Kasper Salin Prize for the St. Mark’s church. In the church, Lewerentz used frameless windows for the first time. The insulating glass panes were set directly in the wall openings using elastic sealant. There are no door liners, skirtings or moldings and the electrical wiring is visible on the masonry and forms its own architectural expression. The painting is extremely sparse, the surface layers are dominated by natural materials, bricks from Helsingborg's Steam Tile Mill, floor tiles from Höganäs, glulam beams and plywood boards. Most of the lighting fixtures and benches are designed by Lewerentz himself. The church organ is also designed by Lewerentz, with side pieces of plywood. The decoration of the Markus church was created by the artist couple Barbro and Robert Nilsson. They designed, among other things, the two tapestries behind the altar and the crucifix in between. Robert Nilsson also created the church silver, the bronze plate in the wooden gate, and the clinker relief in the façade above the gate. Within the property there are also meeting rooms and a pastor's office around a courtyard with a mirror pond with a bronze fountain, the Lotus Flower by Robert Nilsson. In a side building next to the parish expedition there is a bell tower with four bells. Since the church was inaugurated in 1960, manual bell ringing has been used. The Mark’s Bell-Ringers, a non-profit organization, are responsible for the weekend bell ringings. A fifth bell is placed outside the church gate. It is used especially at the ringing in of the Sabbath, every Saturday evening at 6 PM.
© Copyright 2007 - 2021/ Anders Clausson  Mail: info@lewerentz.one
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